Envy Zinnia Flowers [Palm Coast, Fl]

$3.00

Green Zinnias in your garden make a dramatic display that invigorate your garden and vases with the rarest flower color of all.

 

Palm Coast, Florida Nursery Location

6 in stock

Enter Zip Code to check if Delivery is available in your area

Category: Tags: ,

Description

Light Requirement
Full Sun
The amount of sunlight this plant needs daily in order to perform well in the garden. Full sun means 6 hours of direct sunlight; partial sun means 2-4 hours of direct sun per day; shade means little or no direct sun.
Mature Spread
12 – 14 inches
The width of the plant at maturity.
Mature Height
30 inches
The typical height of the plant at maturity.
Growth Habit
Mound
The genetic tendency of a plant to grow in a certain shape, such as vining or bush like.

How To Plant

  • Select a location in full sun with good rich moist organic soil.
  • Prepare the bed by turning the soil under to a depth of 8 inches. Level with a rake to remove clumps of grass and stones.
  • Most plants respond well to soils amended with organic matter. Compost is a wonderful form of organic matter with a good balance of nutrients and an ideal pH level, it can be added to your planting area at any time. If compost is not available, top dress the soil after planting with 1-2 inches of organic mulch, which will begin to breakdown into compost. After the growing season, a soil test will indicate what soil amendments are needed for the following season.
  • Dig a hole for each plant large enough to amply accommodate the root ball.
  • Place the top of the root ball even with the level of the surrounding soil. Fill with soil to the top of the root ball. Press soil down firmly with your hand leaving a slight depression around the plant to hold water.
  • Water thoroughly, so that a puddle forms in the saucer you have created. This settles the plants in, drives out air pockets and results in good root-to-soil contact.
  • Use the plant tag as a location marker.

How To Care

  • Keep weeds under control during the growing season. Weeds compete with plants for water, space and nutrients, so control them by either cultivating often or use a mulch to prevent their seeds from germinating.
  • Mulches also help retain soil moisture and maintain even soil temperatures. This is especially important for tomatoes as their roots may be easily damaged when weeding, and this can lead to blossom end rot.
  • Keep plants well-watered during the growing season, especially during dry spells. Plants need about 1-2 inches of rain per week during the growing season. Use a rain gauge to check to see if you need to add water. It’s best to water with a drip or trickle system that delivers water at low pressure at the soil level. If you water with overhead sprinklers, water early in the day so the foliage has time to dry off before evening, to minimize disease problems. Keep the soil moist but not saturated.
  • Until plants become established, some protection from extreme winds and direct, hot sunlight may be necessary. Good air movement is also important.
  • After new growth appears, a light fertilizer may be applied. Keep granular fertilizers away from the plant crown and foliage to avoid burn injury. Use low rates of a slow release fertilizer such as Flower-tone, as higher rates may encourage root rots.
  • Pinch young plants to encourage branching unless you are growing them exclusively for cut flowers and want long stems.
  • Remove spent flower heads to keep plants flowering until fall. Zinnias make terrific cut flowers, and cutting the flowers encourages new blooms.
  • Remove plants after they are killed by frost in fall to avoid disease issues the following year.

Tips

  • Plant zinnias in mixed plantings with other summer-blooming annuals, or place small groups of zinnias among perennials. They are at home in cottage and children’s gardens, and they are often grown in cutting gardens.
  • Shorter zinnia varieties are ideal for containers. Take care not to overcrowd them or the flowers may be significantly smaller than they should be and the plants may be taller. Always use a commercial potting mix, do not use garden soil, and make sure the containers have adequate drainage. Container grown plants will require extra water and fertilizer, look for signs of wilt or a nutrient deficiency.
  • Cut stems before the flower is open for cut flowers.
  • Zinnias attract hummingbirds, butterflies and beneficial insects.

Common Pests

  • Aphids: Greenish, red, black or peach colored sucking insects can spread disease as they feed on the undersides of leaves. They leave a sticky residue on foliage that attracts ants. TBK Nursery Recommends: Introduce or attract natural predators into your garden such as lady beetles and wasps who feed on aphids. You can also wash them off with a strong spray, or use an insecticidal soap.
  • Aster Yellows: Plants are stunted, develop witch’s brooms (excessive growth), petals turn green and become deformed. This virus-like condition is spread by leafhoppers. TBK Nursery Recommends: Remove infected plants and destroy them. Control leafhoppers. Remove weeds in the area which serve as alternate hosts to the disease.
  • Leafhoppers: Leafhoppers cause injury to leaves and stunt growth. They also spread disease. TBK Nursery Recommends: Remove plant debris. Use insecticidal soaps. 
  • Japanese Beetles: TBK Nursery Recommends: Hand pick early in the morning into a bucket of soapy water. Plants are shorter than is characteristic for the variety and the flowers are much smaller: When zinnias are overcrowded they can become stunted and produce smaller flowers. Always follow the spacing recommendations for each variety.
  • Spider Mites: These tiny spider-like pests are about the size of a grain of pepper. They may be red, black, brown or yellow. They suck on the plant juices removing chlorophyll and injecting toxins which cause white dots on the foliage. There is often webbing visible on the plant. They cause the foliage to turn yellow and become dry and stippled. They multiply quickly and thrive in dry conditions. TBK Nursery Recommends: Spider mites may be controlled with a forceful spray every other day. Try hot pepper wax or insecticidal soap.

Common Diseases

  • Alternaria Leaf Spot: Small, round reddish brown spots with white to gray centers form on the upper surface of the leaves and along the midrib. The lesions may encircle the stems and cause wilt. This disease is worse in warm, wet or very humid weather. TBK Nursery Recommends:  Avoid getting water on the foliage. Remove infected plant parts and do not work around wet plants. Provide plenty of air circulation.
  • Aster Yellows: Plants are stunted, develop witch’s brooms (excessive growth), petals turn green and become deformed. This virus-like condition is spread by leafhoppers. TBK Nursery Recommends: Remove infected plants and destroy them. Control leafhoppers. Remove weeds in the area which serve as alternate hosts to the disease.
  • Botrytis: This fungus causes a grey mold on flowers, leaves, stems and buds. It thrives in cool wet weather conditions. TBK Nursery Recommends: Remove affected plant parts, avoid watering at night and getting water on the plant when watering. Make sure plants have good air circulation.
  • Powdery Mildew: This fungus disease occurs on the top of the leaves in humid weather conditions. The leaves appear to have a whitish or greyish surface and may curl. TBK Nursery Recommends: Avoid powdery mildew by providing good air circulation for the plants by good spacing and pruning.

FAQs

Can I grow zinnias as a houseplant? Zinnias require full sun and hot temperatures to grow well and may not perform well in many homes. Shorter varieties may be tried in a warm sunroom during the summer.
How do I condition my cut zinnia flowers?  Bring a bucket of water with you to the garden when you cut your flowers and put them in the water as soon as you cut them. This will allow them to take up water through the freshly cut stem.  Cut on an angle to give more surface area for the water to be taken up. Keep them out of the direct sun.
Do I need to stake my zinnias? Taller varieties may benefit from staking, especially if they are in a windy area.
Why are my zinnias tall and thin with much smaller flowers than expected? If zinnias are planted too closely together they will produce tall plants and much smaller flowers. Always follow the recommended spacing on the planting instructions.